The Art Source exhibition took place in the middle of November of 2022. Below is a photo of my stand (K23/K24) which was 10m in length and located on the balcony in the mainhall.

Humans live in a world of colour. Colour is all around us - red, blue, yellow, and everything in between. But what about those special colours that transform as your angle of viewing shifts? Colours that encompass the rainbow and are often described as such, yet aren't actually a rainbow? This is known as iridescence.

In its latest fine art exhibition, the Louisiana Art & Science Museum has partnered with Dr. Nathan Lord, Assistant Professor in the Department of Entomology and Director of the Louisiana State Arthropod Museum, to explore iridescence. Through works of art by Karl Gaff (Ireland), Ted Kinsman (New York), Christopher Marley (Oregon), Kate Nichols (California), Soo Sunny Park (New Hampshire), Jennifer Robison (Louisiana), and Franziska Schenk (England), along with partners from Louisiana State University, visitors will uncover the scientific principles that explain the rainbow-like, colour-shifting phenomenon of iridescence. There is more to this captivating occurrence than meets the eye.

I am honoured to have been invited to showcase 5 of my polarised light photomicrograph art works in the "Iridescence" exhibition during the period of July 17, 2021 - July 31, 2022.

Learn more at exploreiridescence.com. All images are courtesy of the artists.

The inaugural Science Photographer of the Year exhibition showcases extraordinary, breathtaking images of science in action. Bringing together science and art, this exhibition celebrates the wonders of the scientific world with everything from space to the human body. The exhibition took place at the Manchester Museum of Science & Industry.

This solo exhibition showcased my best artworks made up to 2019. It showed chemicals in ways never seen before, making the invisible visible through colourful works of art.

The inaugural Science Photographer of the Year exhibition showcases extraordinary, breathtaking images of science in action. Bringing together science and art, this exhibition celebrates the wonders of the scientific world with everything from space to the human body. The exhibition took place at the London Science Museum.

The exhibition 'Images from Science 3' was dedicated in remembrance to Lennart Nilsson. Nilsson passed away January 2017 at the age of 95. The internationally well known Swedish photographer was born in 1922. Nilsson began experimenting photographing science in the 1950’s. In 1965, his groundbreaking work was featured in Life magazine. At the time his innovation revealed science in new and powerful ways. Nilsson's photographs made the invisible visible and helped communicate science using pictures to new audiences.

Images from Science 3 was organized to celebrate the production of extraordinary images featuring science. At its core mission, the project aimed to explore the interface of science, technology, art, design, and communication. Science images unlike most other genres of images rarely find their way into art museums.

Rochester Institute of Technology Professors Michael Peres, Bob Rose, Chris Jackson, and Ted Kinsman, and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Professor Norman Barker are passionate about scientific images. They have enjoyed long careers as photographers and designers, but also as authors, educators, and industry leaders. Because of their interests in science images, they collaborated to produce the third traveling exhibition sharing some of the world’s most extraordinary images and image-makers who explore science as a subject.

This solo exhibition showcased my best artworks made up to 2019. It showed chemicals in ways never seen before, making the invisible visible through colourful works of art.

This solo exhibition at the National Botanic Gardens, Dublin was my first exhibition. On display were my scanning electron microscopy art of various botanical subjects such as lichens and ferns.